export Archives - European Industrial Pharmacists Group (EIPG)

A new member within EIPG


The European Industrial Pharmacists Group (EIPG) is pleased to announce the Romanian Association (AFFI) as its newest member following the annual General Assembly of EIPG in Rome (20th-21st April 2024). Commenting on the continued growth of EIPG’s membership, EIPG President Read more

The EU Parliament voted its position on the Unitary SPC


by Giuliana Miglierini The intersecting pathways of revision of the pharmaceutical and intellectual property legislations recently marked the adoption of the EU Parliament’s position on the new unitary Supplementary Protection Certificate (SPC) system, parallel to the recast of the current Read more

Reform of pharma legislation: the debate on regulatory data protection


by Giuliana Miglierini As the definition of the final contents of many new pieces of the overall revision of the pharmaceutical legislation is approaching, many voices commented the possible impact the new scheme for regulatory data protection (RDP) may have Read more

The EU Parliament voted its position on the Unitary SPC

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by Giuliana Miglierini

The intersecting pathways of revision of the pharmaceutical and intellectual property legislations recently marked the adoption of the EU Parliament’s position on the new unitary Supplementary Protection Certificate (SPC) system, parallel to the recast of the current SPC Regulation (EC) 469/2009. The unitary SPC system will apply also to plant protection products (under different regulations), and it will allow for the obtainment of up to 5 years IP protection beyond the life of the patent.

The new system will complement the unitary patent system, as part of the overall “EU patent package” announced in 2023, and which also includes the proposed regulation on compulsory licensing (we wrote about this last week) and the one on standard essential patents. According to the EU Parliament, the procedure on unitary SPCs will now stop after the European elections.

A report on the potential impact of the unitary supplementary protection certificates on access to health technologies, prepared by the Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs for the Parliament’s Committee for Legal Affairs, is also available.

The main amendments to the Commission’s proposal

The text adopted by the Parliament on 28 February 2024 (together with the legislative resolution on the recast of the SPC regulation) refers to the proposed new regulation amending Regulation (EU) 2017/1001 (EU trademark), Regulation (EC) 1901/2006 (medicinal products for paediatric use) and Regulation (EU) 608/2013 (custom enforcement of intellectual property rights).

The report of the rapporteur, Tiemo Wölken, specifies the entities or people that provided him with input in the preparation of the document, among which are also EFPIA and Medicines for Europe.

The amended text highlights the importance of pharmaceutical research in ensuring the EU’s competitiveness, but also the difficulty of establishing a direct link between this and the rules aimed to support research in innovative medicinal products. The point is that “authorised medicines from third countries are equally eligible to receive all Union incentives, just as Union-based innovative companies can equally benefit from incentives in third countries”. This may lead to companies moving their activities in other countries offering greater protection.

The adopted text better specifies cases for which manufacturing is possible in the EU in presence of a still valid unitary SPC, i.e. export to a third country, where protection does not exist or has expired, or storing the product in order to be ready to enter the EU market upon expiry of the corresponding SPC (the so-called EU “day-one” entry).

To obtain granting of the unitary SPC, the product should fall within the scope of one or more claims of the basic patent. To this instance, the Parliament made specific reference to the description and drawings of the patent, and to the skilled-on-the-art “person’s general knowledge in the relevant field and of the prior art at the filing date or priority date of the basic patent”. The same applies also to active ingredients in combination products, each of which needs to be specifically identifiable. The approved text removes any reference to the concept of “therapeutic equivalence”.

The Parliament specified that the information on granted unitary SPCs provided in the register should not be used for patent linkage or other administrative decisions related to generics or biosimilars. The text also clarifies how to consider “economically linked” parties, that are not entitled to obtain multiple SPCs for the same product.

A single procedure and a digital-by-default process

The main objective of the unitary SPC system is to allow the submission of a single application to obtain extension of the IP protection in all European countries which are part of the EU’s unitary patent system. The digital-by-default principle should guide the entire procedure leading to the grant of a unitary SPC, starting from the submission of the application to the European Intellectual Property Office (EUIPO) using a format to be made available by the EUIPO itself. Combined applications for supplementary protection certificates should also be made possible.

The application for a unitary SPC would be based on an already existing centralised marketing authorisation issued by EMA. Information on any direct public financial support received for research related to the development of the product for which the SPC is requested should be also provided.

In charge of the examination would be a new SPC division created within the EUIPO. The examination would be run by an examiner from the Office and two examiners from national competent authorities, with sufficient expertise (at least one examiner with a minimum of five years’ experience in the examination of patents and supplementary protection certificates).

The examination opinion should be issued within six months of the publication of the application. A new amendment has been introduced to allow for an expedited examination (4 months) in case, for example, of imminent expiry of the basic patent. Should multiple oppositions be filed against an examination opinion, they should be jointly dealt with by the EUIPO, with issuing of a single decision. The Parliament has maintained the pre-grant opposition procedure, which attracted many criticisms as it might result in increased uncertainty for patentees.

From a market perspective, access to products covered by unitary SPCs should be favoured in countries where the right-holder does not have the intention to launch them, by mean of voluntary agreements to licence the corresponding rights in those markets. A new Recital underlines the importance of a timely entry of generics and biosimilars in the UE market in order to increase competition, reduce prices and ensure sustainability of national healthcare systems and access to affordable medicines.

Comments from Medicines for Europe

The European association of the generic and biosimilar industry, Medicines for Europe, published a note highlighting the possible impact the new unitary SPC may have, due to the significant geographical extension of the IP protection also in countries where the concerned medicines are not normally launched or launched very late.

It would be very important to prevent a possible misuse of the system, is the request of the industrial association. To this instance, the safeguards identified by the Parliament for the examination of applications before the granting of a unitary SPC are considered adequate, as for transparency and quality of the procedures. Furthermore, according to Medicines for Europe, the pre-grant opposition mechanism included in the Parliament’s position should prove useful to prevent invalid (non-innovative) SPCs from being enforced and ultimately invalidated in Court.

The explicit ban of the patent linkage is also considered very important, and it should be coupled to transparency of SPC expiry dates in the register so to ensure these data would not be misused to implement unlawful and anti-competitive patent linkage strategies.

The position of the Parliament goes in the right direction and rightfully bans patent linkage. The pre-grant opposition will ensure a timely grant of SPCs for innovative drugs (a maximum 14 months or 12 with an expedited procedure) and prevent monopoly extensions for those drugs that do not have a legal right to an SPC because they are not innovative. The ban of patent linkage will serve access to medicines by preventing pricing and reimbursement or tender procedure delays for generic and biosimilar medicines at SPC expiry. Medicines for Europe will engage constructively with the EU institutions to ensure the most efficient, quality, and fair SPC system possible for the future.”, said Adrian van den Hoven, Director General of Medicines for Europe, commenting on the report.

You can find here more comments on the approved and deleted amendments.


EFPIA’s Annual Report on the Pharmaceutical industry 2022

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by Giuliana Miglierini

In the 21 years from 2000 to 2021 – in which time we’ve come through the Global Financial Crisis and a pandemic – EFPIA companies have more than doubled production, increased exports by a factor of six, and recorded a trade balance that puts it far ahead of other high-tech sectors in Europe”, writes EFPIA’s Director General Nathalie Moll commenting the Annual Report2022.

Despite this marked growth, many challenges are still to be faced to allow the European pharmaceutical industry to maintain and even strengthen its role as primary hub of innovation, thus contributing to the overall success of the EU’s economy. It can be expected, for example, that the energy crisis will be highly impacting pharmaceutical productions, also in the form of increased difficulties to guarantee a constant supply of raw materials. This would represent just the last drop adding to existing regulatory barriers slowing down R&D and to the impact of fiscal austerity policies that may discourage investors.

At the same time, we have seen the growth of Brazilian, Chinese and Indian markets outstrip growth in the top 5 European markets. Our global competitors have prioritised life sciences and we must respond with similar ambition”, adds Nathalie Moll.

The 2021 of the pharmaceutical industry

According to EFPIA’s Annual Report 2022, the value of production for the research-based European pharmaceutical industry has grown from 127.5 billion euro in year 2000 to 300 billion in2021. Even more relevant is the growth of export, increased from €90.9 bln to €565 bln over the same period. In 2021 imports counted for €390 bln, with a positive trade balance of €175 bln.

The research-based pharma industry employed last year 840,000 units (125,000 of which in R&D) and invested €41.5 bln in research and development activities.

The total European pharmaceutical market value at ex-factory prices increased from €89.4 bln in 2000 to €255 bln in 2021. The pharmaceutical expenditure supported by statutory health insurance systems (and referred to ambulatory care only) grown from €76.9 bln to €157.5 bln over the same time.

Despite these positive figures, EFPIA warns about the danger of migration of many R&D activities from Europe towards fast-growing markets such as Brazil, India and China, thanks to the more favourable conditions. The pharmaceutical market in these countries grown, respectively,11.7%, 6.7% and 11.8% in the period 2016-2021, compared to 5.8% of top EU countries (France, Germany, Italy, Spain and United Kingdom) and 5.6% of the US.

North America still represents the wider market area for pharmaceuticals (49.1%, vs 23.4% for Europe), and accounts for the higher proportion of new launches (64.4%, vs 16.8% of top five EU countries). In 2020 China marked the higher pharmaceutical R&D expenditure (78,5 billion Yuan, from 1.9 bln Yuan in 2000), overcoming for the first time the US ($72.4 bln), while Europe is positioned far behind (€39,7 bln). Not less interesting is the 3.2% market share assigned to emerging, high-growth pharmaceutical markets including many African, South American and Asiatic countries (Algeria, Argentina, Bangladesh, Brazil, Colombia, Chile, China, Egypt, India, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Mexico, Nigeria, Pakistan, Philippines, Poland, Russia, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, Turkey and Vietnam).

Parallel trade is a characteristic of the European pharmaceutical market, due to the persistent fragmentation of many policies in different countries. Denmark saw in 2020 the higher share of parallel imports in pharmacy market sales (26.9%), well above other countries (e.g. 10.9% Sweden,9.1% UK, 8.3% Germany).

 Issues slowing down R&D

According to EFPIA, the length of time needed to bring a new medicine to the market (up to 12-13 years) is still a major issue impacting the attractiveness of European R&D. An average of one-two new synthetic substances out of every 10 thousand exiting the labs passes all the scrutiny steps needed to reach approval. The total costs of R&D was estimated in 2014 to reach €1.97 billion, indicates the report.

Germany, Switzerland and the UK are the European countries more active in research and development (€7.8 bln, €7.4 bln and € 5.6 bln expenditure in 2020, respectively). Clinical research accounts for the higher percentage of investment (44.1%, mainly in phase III studies), far above pre-human and pre-clinical research (14.9%) and phase IV studies aimed to post-marketing surveillance (11.5%). Approval studies account for 4.3% of the total R&D expenditure.

The US generated 159 new chemical entities (both chemical and biological) in years 2017-2021, almost doubling Europe (72) and a group of other countries (71), excluding Japan (41). Even more worrying, in 2021 China lagged just behind Europe as originator of new active substances launched for the first time on the world market (18 vs 19, respectively), while the US confirmed its leading position (35). According to EFPIA, this trend is associated with a marked lower annual growth rate of pharmaceutical R&D expenditure in Europe (4.0% for years 2017-2021), compared to that in the US (8.5%) and China (12.9%). Despite this, health industries still position at the first place of the ranking of industrial sectors by overall R&D intensity (12.4%, vs 8.7% of ITC services and 7.4% of ITC products).

The pharmaceutical production

Switzerland, Germany and Italy are the leading European hubs for pharmaceutical production (€53.2 bln, €32.3 bln and €34.3 bln of value, respectively). This corresponds in Germany to a significant higher number of people employed in the sector (115,519, vs 66,400 in Italy and 47,000 in Switzerland). EFPIA also mentions that the research-based pharmaceutical industry generates about three times more indirect employment along its value chain (both upstream and downstream) than it does directly, thus significantly contributing to the overall European job market. This is even more true for highly skilled jobs, thus preventing the phenomenon of brain-draining towards more attractive countries for scientific talents.

The US remains the favoured trading partner for the EU pharmaceutical industry, accounting for 32.2% EU exports and 30.2% imports. Switzerland is at the first place for EU imports (36.4%, and 11.8% EU exports); more distanced are the UK, China and Japan.

Fragmentation still impacts the European market

Fragmentation of policies on price and reimbursement and different VAT rates for medicinal product sis a very typical phenomenon still limiting the potentiality of the European pharmaceutical market.

According to EFPIA, in 2020 the retail price of a medicine corresponded on average to 66.8% rewarding for the manufacturer, 17.4% for the pharmacist, 10.6% for the State and 5.2% for the wholesaler. The top 5 countries for market value at ex-factory prices were Germany (€42.9 bln), Italy (€23.4 bln), France (€29, 5 bln), the UK (€24.6 bln) and Spain (€17.6 bln); Russia also represented a relevant market (€18,4 bln). Italy sees the higher market share for generics (67.6%), well above Poland (58%) and Austria (49%). EFPIA also monitored the VAT rates applied to prescription and OTC medicines in different European countries, compared to the standard VAT rates. Malta (0%), Sweden (0%), France (2.1%), Switzerland (2.5%), Luxembourg (3%), Spain (4%), Lithuania, Croatia, Cyprus, Hungary (5%) marked the lower VAT rates on prescription medicines. In some case, these same rates applies also to OTC products (Croatia, Cyprus, Hungary, Luxembourg, Malta, Spain, Switzerland), while in other countries the rates for this category of medicines is higher (France 10%, Lithuania 21%, Sweden 25%).