risk assessment Archives - European Industrial Pharmacists Group (EIPG)

Approval of the Data Governance Act, and EMA’s consultation on the protection of personal data in the CTIS


by Giuliana Miglierini The Data Governance Act (DGA) was approved and adopted in May 2022 by the European Council, following the positive position of the EU Parliament; the new legislation will entry into force after being signed by the presidents Read more

The transition towards EMA's new Digital Application Dataset Integration (DADI) user interface


by Giuliana Miglierini The Digital Application Dataset Integration (DADI) network project is aimed to replace the current PDF-based electronic applications forms (eAFs) used for regulatory submissions with new web-forms accessible through the DADI user interface. The European Medicines Agency (EMA) has Read more

IVD regulation in force: new MDCG guidelines and criticalities for innovation in diagnostics


by Giuliana Miglierini The new regulation on in vitro diagnostic medical devices (IVDR, Regulation (EU) 2017/746) entered into force on 26 May 2022. The new rules define a completely renewed framework for the development, validation and use of these important Read more

The new Annex 21 to GMPs

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by Giuliana Miglierini

The new Annex 21 to GMPs (C(2022) 843 final) that EIPG gave a significant contribution in reviewing the original draft and thoroughly presented it within a webinar to its members on August 2020, was published by the European Commission on 16 February 2022; the document provides a guideline on the import of medicinal products from extra-EU countries. The new annex will entry into force six months after its publication, on 21 August 2022. Its contents should be read in parallel with the EU Guide to Good Manufacturing Practice for Medicinal Products and its other annexes, those requirements continue to apply as appropriate.

Annex 21 details the GMP requirements referred to human, investigational and/or veterinary medicinal products imported in the European Union and European Economic Area (EEA) by holders of a Manufacturing Import Authorisation (MIA). The new Annex does not apply to medicinal products entering the EU/EEA for export only, as they do not undergo any process or release aimed to place them on the internal market. Fiscal transactions are also not considered as a part of the new annex.

The main principles

According to Annex 21, once a batch of a medicinal product has been physically imported in a EU/EEA country, including clearance by the custom authority of the entrance territory, it is subject to the Qualified Person (QP) certification or confirmation. Manufacturing operations in accordance with the marketing authorisation or clinical trial authorisation can be run on imported bulk and intermediate products prior to the QP certification/confirmation. To this regard, all importation responsibilities for both medicinal products and bulks/intermediates must be carried out at specific sites authorised under a MIA. These include the site of physical importation and the site of QP certification (for imported medicinal products) or QP confirmation (for bulk or intermediate products undergoing further processing).

Marketing authorisation holders (MAHs) for imported products authorised in the EU remain in any case the sole responsible for placing the products in the European/EEA market. Annex 21 requires sites responsible for QP certification to verify an ongoing stability program is in place at the third country site where manufacturing is performed. This last one has to transmit to the QP all the information needed to verify the ongoing product quality, and relevant documentation (i.e. protocols, results and reports) should be available for inspection at the site responsible for QP certification. QP’s responsibilities also extend to the verification that reference and retention samples are available in accordance to Annex 19 of the GMPs, and that safety features are placed on the packaging, if required.

Importation sites should be adequately organised and equipped to ensure the proper performance of activities on imported products. More specifically, a segregated quarantine area should be available to store the incoming products until the occurrence of release for further processing or QP certification/confirmation.

European GMP rules or equivalent standards shall be followed for the manufacturing of medicinal products in third countries due to be imported in the EU. The manufacturing process has to comply to the one described in the Marketing Authorisation (MA), the clinical trial authorization (CTA) and the relevant quality agreement in place between the MAH and the manufacturer. The respect of EU GMP rules or equivalent standards should be documented through regular monitoring and periodic on-site audits of the third country manufacturing sites, to be implemented by the site responsible for QP certification or by a third party on its behalf.

The QP of the importation site is also responsible for the verification of testing requirements, in order to confirm the compliance of the imported products to the authorised specifications detailed in the MA. The verification of testing requirements can be avoided only in the case a Mutual Recognition Agreement (MRA) or an Agreement on conformity assessment and acceptance of industrial products (ACAA) is in place between the European Union and the third country where the production of the medicinal product is located.

All agreements between the different entities involved in the manufacturing and importation process, including the MAH and/or sponsor, should be in the written form, as indicated by Chapter 7 of the EU GMP Guide.

The Pharmaceutical Quality System of the importing site

According to the European legislation (Chapter 1 of the EU GMP Guide), all activities performed in the EU with reference to the manufacturing and distribution of pharmaceutical products should fall under to umbrella of the company’s Pharmaceutical Quality System (PQS). This is also true for sites involved with importation activities, those PQS should reflect the scope of the activities carried out. A specific procedure should be established to manage complaints, quality defects and product recalls.

More in detail, the new Annex 21 establishes that sites responsible for QP certification of imported products (including the case of further processing before export with the exception of investigational medicinal products) have to run periodic Product Quality Reviews (PQR). In this case too, the respective responsibilities of the parties involved in compiling the Reviews should be specified by written agreements. Should the sampling of the imported product be conducted in a third country (in accordance with Annex 16 of the GMPs), the the PQR should also include an assessment of the basis for continued reliance on the sampling practice. A review of deviations encountered during transportation up to the point of batch certification should be also available, and a comparison should be run to assess the correspondence of analytical results from importation testing with those listed by the Certificate of Analysis generated by the third country manufacturer.

Full documentation available at MIA sites

The QP’s certification/confirmation step for an imported batch has to be paralleled by the availability of the full batch documentation at the corresponding MIA holder’s site; in case of need, this site may also have access to documents supporting batch certification, according to Annex 16. Other MIA holders involved in the process may access batch documentation for their respective needs and responsibilities, as detailed in the written agreements. A risk assessment is needed to justify the frequency for the review of the full batch documentation at the site responsible for QP certification/confirmation; the so established periodicity should be included in the PQS.

Annex 21 also lists the type of documents that should be available at the importation sites, including the details of transportation and receipt of the product, and relevant ordering and delivery documentation. This last one should specify the site of origin of the product, the one of physical importation and shipping details (including transportation route, temperature monitoring records, and customs documentation). Appropriate documentation should be also available to confirm reconciliation of the quantities of batches which underwent subdivision and were imported separately.

Requirements set forth in Chapter 4 of the GMPs apply to the retention of the documentation; the availability at the third country manufacturing site of an adequate record retention policy equivalent to EU requirements shall be assessed by the site responsible for QP certification. Should it be appropriate, translations of original documents and certificates should be provided to improve understanding.


Revision of the CDMh’s Q&As document on nitrosamine impurities

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by Giuliana Miglierini

The review process of medicinal products started in 2018 to assess the presence of nitrosamine impurities is still ongoing. The Coordination Group for Mutual Recognition and Decentralised Procedure (CMDh) last updated in December2021 its Questions & Answers document (Q&A) proving guidance on how to approach the revision procedure.

The US’s Food and Drug Administration (FDA) also updated its guidance on how to minimise the risks related to nitrosamine through formulation design changes. We summarise the latest news of the topic of nitrosamine impurities.

The CMDh’s update of the Q&A document

The CMDh Questions & Answers document (CMDh/400/2019, Rev.5) specifically refers to the implementation of the outcome of Art. 31 referral on angiotensin-II-receptor antagonists (sartans) containing a tetrazole group. According to the indications released in November 2020 by EMA’s human medicines committee (CHMP), these outcomes should now be aligned with those issued for other classes of medicines. This provision impacted on the allowed limits for nitrosamines, which are now applied to the finished products instead than to the active ingredient. The limits are determined on the basis of internationally agreed standards (ICH M7(R1)).

Companies are called to implement an appropriate control strategy to prevent or limit the presence of nitrosamine impurities as much as possible and to improve their manufacturing processes where necessary. A risk assessment should be run to evaluate the possible presence of N-nitrosamines in medicinal products, and tests carried out if appropriate.

Four different conditions (A-D) are set for the marketing authorisation (MA) of tetrazole sartans, with specific dates to be met for their fulfilment by marketing authorisation holders (MAHs). Revision 5 of the Q&As document specifically addresses conditions B and D.

Condition B asks the MAH to submit a step 2 response in the general “call for review”. To lift the condition on the risk assessment for the finished product, and provided no nitrosamine was detected in step 2 or levels are below 10% of acceptable intake (AI), submission of the step 2 response must now be followed by the submission of the outcome of the risk assessment. To this instance, the relevant template “Step 2 – No nitrosamine detected response template” should be used to fill a type IA C.I.11.a variation.

A further amendment to Condition B refers to nitrosamines being detected in step 2 above 10% AI. In this case, a variation application should be submitted as appropriate to support changes to the manufacturing process and the possible introduction of a limit in the specification of the finished product.

Condition D now specifies that it applies only to N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) and N nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) impurities. Thus, to lift the condition on the change of the finished product specification, and if the MAH wants to apply for omission from the specification, supporting data and risk assessments should be submitted via a type IB C.I.11.z variation referring only to these two impurities. Should any other nitrosamine impurity be potentially present, data should be submitted under separate variation (also grouping them together). Conditions A and C remain unchanged. The former refers to the three different possibilities for lifting the condition on the risk assessment for the active substance and with specific reference to the manufacturing process used to prepare it, the second to lifting the condition on the control strategy.

The guidance from the FDA

The US regulatory agency Food and Drug Administration (FDA) released in February 2021 the first revision of the “Guidance for Industry Control of Nitrosamine Impurities in Human Drugs”, establishing a three-step process to demonstrate the fulfilment of requirements.

The guideline widely discusses the structure of nitrosamine impurities and the possible root causes for their presence in medicinal products. While not binding for manufacturers, recommendations contained in the document should be applied in order to evaluate the risk level for the contamination of both active ingredients and finished products. This exercise should be run on the basis of a prioritisation taking into consideration the maximum daily dose, the duration of treatment, the therapeutic indication, and the number of patients treated.

The FDA provides also the acceptable intake limits for a set of different nitrosamine impurities (NDMA, NDEA, NMBA, NMPA, NIPEA, and NDIPA); the approach outlined in ICH M7(R1) should be used to determine the risk associated with other types of nitrosamines.

Manufacturers do not need to submit the results of the risk assessment to the FDA, the relevant documentation has to be made available just upon specific request.

The second step refers to products showing a risk for the presence of nitrosamine impurities. In this case, highly sensitive confirmatory testing is needed to confirm the presence of the impurities.

The implementation of all changes to the manufacturing process for the API or final product have then to be submitted to the FDA in the form of drug master file amendments and changes to approved applications.

The Agency also provides specific guidance for API manufacturers to optimise the route of manufacturing in order to prevent the possible formation of nitrosamine impurities. API manufacturers should participate to the risk assessment run by the MAH; this last exercise should include the evaluation of any pathway (including degradation) that may introduce nitrosamines during drug product manufacture or storage.

Additional points to be considered

A Communication issued in November 2021 by the FDA specifies the terms for the recommended completion dates of the above mentioned three steps and adds some additional points to be considered in the evaluations. MAHs should have already completed by 31st March 2021 all risk assessments, while there is time up to 1st October 2023 for confirmatory testing and reporting changes. According to the FDA, the time left is enough to include in the development of the mitigation strategies also new considerations on how formulation design may prove useful to control nitrosamine levels in drug products.

More in particular, manufacturers are asked to evaluate the presence of nitrosamine drug substance-related impurities (NDSRIs), that may be produced if nitrite impurities are present in excipients (at parts-per-million amounts) or may be generated during manufacturing or shelf-life storage. Should NDSRIs be present, FDA recommends the mitigation strategy should include a supplier qualification program that takes into account potential nitrite impurities across excipient suppliers and excipient lots.

Formulation design is another possible approach to solve the issue. This may use, for example, common antioxidants – such as ascorbic acid (vitamin C) or alpha-tocopherol (vitamin E) – that according to the scientific literature inhibit the formation of nitrosamines in vivo. The kinetic of the reaction leading to the formation of nitrosamine impurities may be also addressed by using a neutral or basic pH for formulation, to avoid acidic conditions which favours the side reaction.

Formulation changes may be submitted to the FDA through supplements or amendments to the applications, also following a preliminary meeting with the Agency to better discuss the approach to be used. Should this be the case, applicants or manufacturers are asked to prepare a comprehensive meeting package with the appropriate regulatory and scientific data on the selected approach to be submitted to the FDA in advance of the meeting.


Small-scale models for process development

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by Giuliana Miglierini

There are many steps within a pharmaceutical production that may require the availability of a model of the manufacturing process in order to run targeted simulations. To this instance, a useful approach is represented by the so-called “small-scale models” (SSMs, or “scaled-down models”), that are usually developed to reflect the real working parameters available for a certain large manufacturing facility.
A small-scale model needs to undergo a process qualification (SSMQ) in order to be acceptable from the regulatory point of view. The main features and criticalities of SSMQ have been discussed in a series of articles published on BioProcess Online, and based on the results of a survey run between the representatives of large biopharmaceutical companies participating to the BioPhorum Development Group. A white paper on SSMs is also available.

The main requirements for an SSM
A critical requirement for a small-scale model to be accepted by regulators is its ability to exactly replicate the large-scale manufacturing process. This can be assessed and justified by choosing appropriate process parameters to be used as inputs for the simulation and obtaining outputs showing performance and quality attributes comparable to the large-scale process.
Small-scale models can be used both in early development, for example to support clinical manufacturing, and in late-stage development (e.g. to identify critical process parameters).
The overall quality of the model increases in the passage from early- to late-stage applications, due to the increasing number of data available to simulate the processes. Alternatively, a scientific evaluation of the process without application of a formal statistical method might be used, but a good experience and sufficient platform knowledge is needed in order to obtain valid results.
Other examples of the utility of SSMs in biopharmaceutical manufacturing include media stability and cell line stability studies, qualification of raw materials, impurity clearance validation, postapproval process changes and resolution of deviations.
The clearing of infectious viruses is a particularly critical step in biomanufacturing, and it should be run according to the ICH Q5A8 guideline; to this instance, SSMs may turn useful to validate the process at the laboratory scale. Other points to be kept in mind refer to the possibility of different layouts, mode of operation, geometry or materials for the systems used in small-scale vs large-scale plants.

Validation and qualification of the SSMs
A risk-based assessment of the parameters of choice can be used to validate the representativeness of model, with key performance indicators (e.g., titer, VCD, etc.) and product quality attributes (PQAs) used to run the comparison. A risk-based approach should be the choice also for the design of the small-scale model, taking into consideration both technical and business risks.
More than just one large-stage run (with a minimum of 3) is suggested to support the full qualification of the small-scale models by statistical analysis, according the survey. The choice to assess or qualify the SSM depends on its intended use.
The dimensions of the model can vary according to its specific target use. A benchtop-scale (1 L to 10 L) is common for upstream unit operations, but micro-scale bioreactors (15 to 250 mL) and pilot-scale (50 to 200L) models are other useful options. The benchtop scale of a chromatography
column can be used to model downstream processes, with micro-scale models or pilot plants as other alternatives. The article also reports a table to help identify the correct choice of the scale-independent “scaling parameter”.

In some instances, it might be advisable to use the same media and buffers as in the real manufacturing process, as well as the same raw materials. Procedures to prepare the buffers and other materials should be also comparable.
The BioPhorum Development Group provided examples of how to address qualification, including a satellite or non-satellite approach for upstream unit operations according to the characteristics of the inoculum transfer and scale of the run, the location of the development laboratories and the commercial site. An important parameter to be considered is the temperature for shipping, should it be required a transfer of materials between different locations; shipping at ≤-65°C is the preferred choice for many companies, writes the authors.
Different procedures for filtration have been also addressed, as well as the analytical setup for small-scale experiments; measures may be run in the QC GMP laboratories associated to the manufacturing site or in non-GMP labs for small-scale model qualification. A mix of the two may represent the preferred option in many cases, indicates the article. Training is fundamental to ensure the consistency of small-scale unit operations independent of the operator. Formal documentation should be also produced should the small-scale model undergo new runs of qualification.

The choice of the statistical methods
All data obtained both from the small-scale model and the large manufacturing plant needs to undergo a statistical analysis to be used for the qualification of the production process.
Descriptive statistical methods may depend upon the satellite or non-satellite character of the study, and they may turn useful to provide data in the form of scattered plots to be used for qualification assessment, for example by SMEs or health authorities.
Inferential statistical methods compare data obtained from the small-scale model and the atscale one, which must be representative of populations and referred to stable processes all over the product lifetime. Attention should be paid to the indication of “equivalent” or “notequivalent” results obtained from the applied method, as errors are possible in the 5-10% of cases.
“This is an important fact often overlooked by scientists and health authorities in evaluating the statistical component in a qualification report. It is also an important rationale for not using statistical methods alone to qualify or not qualify a model”, warn the authors of the article. Possible examples of inferential statistical procedures are the difference tests (or null hypothesis significance tests, NHSTs) known as T-test and F-test. Equivalence tests (Two One Sided T-tests, TOST) are also possible to obtain evidence of equivalency, especially in the case of a satellite design of the experiment. Quality range (QR) methods are another available option, useful to establish the population ranges. Multivariate analysis (MVA) provides the possibility to consider different, time-based data sets simultaneously, thus supporting the study of the processes under a time evolution perspective.